hacked off

Comedian John Cleese has likened journalists arguing for self-regulation to murderers wanting to police themselves during
Private Eye editor Ian Hislop and his deputy editor Francis Wheen have quit the campaign group Index on Censorship in protest
It's not an oversight or an accident that the PCC fails to spell out to the public which newspapers attract the most complaints and which papers breach the code most often. Look at this table of complaints about UK national daily and Sunday newspapers for 2013, compiled by Hacked Off from the PCC Monthly Complaint Summaries, and you will soon get an idea of who benefits if the public doesn't see these figures...
This country is now very close to settling a problem that has plagued it for generations. The problem was this: how to protect ordinary citizens from lying, bullying and unjustified intrusion carried out in the name of journalism, while at the same time ensuring that journalists were free to do the job they need to do to sustain our democracy. The solution is the Royal Charter on press self-regulation.
Steve Coogan says of his film 'Philomena', that he wanted to say something "sincere and uncynical". The Alan Partridge star
In 2009 newspapers were arguing to MPs that the existence of a no-win-no-fee system giving some ordinary people the ability to sue papers for breaching their rights was an unacceptable constraint on press freedom. The talk of 300 years of press freedom is not based on the facts but is an argument of convenience. Today these papers declare that the press has been free for centuries, but tomorrow, if it suits them, the same papers will insist with equal ardour that the press has never been free.
Rebekah Brooks brought in a new policy at News International about email deletion, which she "may have had a personal interest
What did you do with your extra hour last Sunday? If Instagram were to be believed, I'd hazard a guess it was working on your Halloween costume. Yep, forget Christmas, if there's a 'festival' worth getting dressed up for, Halloween appears to be very much it... with us Brits having taken a cue from our American cousins and embraced the event with gusto this year. Away from pumpkins and cat costumes, it was a toss up this week as to who got the biggest fright.
The fact is that many journalists see regulation, whether self or statuary, as 'crossing the Rubicon' and an invasion into the historic traditions of the British free press. Statuary regulation conjured up by the government in the interests of the politicians? Not under our watch.
Newspaper and magazine publishers have been refused an urgent injunction to stop ministers going to the Privy Council to