Helen Boaden

The key argument seems to be that it these stations lack 'distinctiveness'. The shorthand we often hear - Radios 3 and 4 embody public service broadcasting whilst Radios 1 and 2 are easily replaced by commercial counterparts - is wrong. Take Radio 1. It informs, educates and entertains 10million young listeners a week. It offers daily news (up to six times more news per week than its commercial competitors), regular documentaries (rarely heard on commercial networks) and social action campaigns, highlighting issues like online bullying and teenage suicide. In fact, we estimate around 40% of Radio 1's daytime output is speech - twice as much as comparable commercial outlets.
Helen Boaden, the executive in charge of BBC News when the Jimmy Savile controversy erupted, is to move to a new role heading
BBC staff have been urged not to tweet about the corporation's problems by the acting head of news, Fran Unsworth. She told
The "monumental failures" at the BBC must prompt a complete overhaul of the corporation's management structures, the chair
The BBC has entered some extremely choppy waters of late with Director-General George Entwistle resigning over a disastrous
Veteran BBC presenter David Dimbleby has hit out at bloated management and a culture of "gobbledegook" at the corporation
Those newspapers that are now revelling in the BBC's discomfort are in no position to do so and are motivated less by a commitment to rigorous and independent journalism than by the opportunity to make life difficult for their publicly-funded rival. Some of the hypocrisy is astounding.
Helen Boaden, the head of BBC News, and Stephen Mitchell, her deputy, are to step aside in the wake of the Newsnight report
Caroline Thomson is the favourite to become the new director general of the BBC, according to Ladbrokes. Following George
Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith's department has made a formal complaint to the BBC claiming its coverage of