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Ask anyone working in Afghanistan why peace is still elusive and the answers are predictable. Some will blame Pakistan for
While much of the commentary on the Chilcot report is on the decision to go to war, it is important not to miss the lessons of Britain's occupation of Southern Iraq. How it went from a brilliantly successful initial invasion to a rapidly deteriorating security situation and finally what Chilcot described as the 'humiliating' spectacle of doing a deal with violent militia groups to stop attacks on British troops holed up in their bases is an important story.
The Afghan military has rushed reinforcements to a southern district threatened for days with takeover by the Taliban, the
British troops have been deployed to Afghanistan to help local forces as they fight to take control of a key town after it
In Kabul, there were bullets in the squash court, three in the bedroom, three near my bed, three in our bathroom, one missing the minister by six inches. The gardener has continued to drive his two donkeys about our garden with complete unconcern, but the day has come when only one donkey is left.
When the British war in Afghanistan becomes just a paragraph in a War Studies textbook, the effects of decades of conflict
As Britain approaches the end of its combat operations in Afghanistan, the usual fanfare associated with victory in war will be notably absent. No triumphal parades, no formal surrender ceremony, and no heroic march into an enemy's capital. As Churchill wrote in 1897, "the victory must be looked for in the results."
Here are the five things you need to know on Monday 6 January 2013... 1) GIDEON'S 'YEAR OF HARD TRUTHS' The chancellor has
Imagine you woke up tomorrow and heard on the news that a prominent woman MP here in Britain had been kidnapped along with her two daughters. It would be utterly shocking. Now imagine it's a few weeks later and you hear that another female parliamentarian, a member of the House of Lords for example, has narrowly escaped an attack in which her daughter was killed. But this is exactly what's happened in Afghanistan this summer.
In our report published today, we concluded that, at the end of UK operations in Afghanistan in 2014, the best the UK will be able to do is to withdraw in good order and engage with external partners to improve Afghanistan's future prospects.