HIV stigma

On 4 November the gorgeous and glamorous will gather for the Terrence Higgins Trust's annual Supper Club. Hosts will hold
We can achieve it by testing, so as to minimise the number of guys who don't think they have HIV, but do. We can achieve it by maximising viral suppression and getting as many HIV+ guys on treatment as possible. We can achieve it by using PrEP, not just because it works, but also to take the anxiety and rabbit-in-headlights paralysis out of gay dating.
30 years into the HIV and AIDS epidemic, discrimination continues to be one of the most devastating consequences of an HIV diagnosis, and stands in the way of an effective response.
More and more, we are hearing about the convergence of health and education. You can't learn if you are out of school sick. Lack of education leads to poverty and in turn the inability to access healthcare. To lead productive lives, people need both health and education: the two are cause and effect.
I do understand that for many, the science is not easily understood, and that you may still think doubt about the origins of AIDS is still a matter for legitimate discourse. It is not. It is an entirely irresponsible thing to do, and I beg you even at this late stage to withdraw the screening of this film.
To those less acqainted with the workings of HIV, and more surprised by the news, you'd think this would be cause for celebration. In the gay community, however, the news was received by many with disbelief ("This is bullshit science" said one) or downright fear
The next piece to the HIV puzzle in many ways, is about changing public perceptions. Out-of-date and negative attitudes to HIV can dissuade people from testing - and that's why one in four of those with HIV in the UK are not aware of their status. That's a really dangerous statistic.
Many younger gay men these days have not seen their friends die of AIDS-related illnesses, and there certainly isn't the fear around HIV which their once was. There is a difficult balance to strike here: we don't want to stigmatise HIV further yet at the same time it is difficult to combat the damaging "I don't care" attitude without emphasising the serious nature of the HIV infection.
I can't quite claim a full three decades with HIV. It was in 1984 that I turned up at a clinic with a crop of throat ulcers so impressive the doctor had a photo taken. In retrospect, they were my first HIV symptom.