hospice care

Demand for end of life care is rising as the population grows. Combine this dynamic with a reduction in funding, patients
Last Saturday 8th October marked World Hospice and Palliative Care Day, and this year the theme is 'living and dying in pain: it doesn't have to happen' - an important message on an even more important day. It has now been statistically proven that people who receive palliative care can live for longer.
Going home can mean different things to different people. To some it's that joyful packing up of your bag at the end of a
Play is incredibly important to a child's emotional wellbeing. It is even more important for children with special needs to feel integrated into everyday society, doing the same things as their peers without judgement or limitation.
Kate's story shows just how important it is for commissioners and service-providers to do their best to help people who are approaching the end of life to stay out of hospital. They can save on costs and beds in a severely over-stretched NHS - and most importantly, they can help make it possible for dying people to be cared for in the place they want to be.
This research comes at a watershed moment for the relationship between charities and government. Life to the Full represents our plea for both to be ambitious - ambitious for what they can achieve when they work together, and ambitious for this too-long-overlooked group of children.
I will never regret that our law protected her; preventing her from ending her life when she was vulnerable to despair. Those four years we shared were the most precious gift. Without them, Mum would have missed what she described as some of the richest times in her life and we would have missed understanding just what an amazing person she was.
More recently, the new inspection regime introduced by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) - the regulator for health and adult social care in England - is helping provide a better understanding of quality in hospice care.
The reality is that hospice care is delivered in a surprising range of settings, including in people's homes. In fact 90% of hospice care is delivered away from a hospice building. Hospice teams are also involved in educating staff working in other settings such as care homes and hospitals.
These are tough economic times for statutory funding of healthcare. It would be unrealistic to expect NHS funding for hospice care, which has on average made up a third of funding (32 per cent) for adult hospices and 17 per cent for children's services, to be exempt from this.