House of Lords reform

The House of Lords could be something great if governments weren't too afraid or selfish to change it for the better. Abolishing the House would give governments too much power and we would most certainly run the risk of an oppressive - even a totalitarian-like - government. Real reform could deliver real results. Don't abolish the future, abolish the present holding us back.
The publication of Boundary Commission Proposals for the next election has sparked a lively debate. Inevitably, there is a very close interest in this matter from MPs themselves, some of whom find that the new proposals cut up their beloved constituency into several pieces.
If Theresa May means what she says about her government being for all and not just the "privileged few", then she needs to direct her attention to addressing this sense of powerlessness that is sweeping the nation.
The alternative to participating in such intergovernmental cooperation is standing alone in a world shaped by the survival of the fittest. As the UK has long ceased to belong to those, it is clearly much better off inside the European Union - imperfect as its system of governance might be.
The message couldn't be any clearer: Rather than depleting the number of Scottish MPs any further, David Cameron should instead actually listen to the voters of Scotland for once. We need to abolish the ridiculous House of Lords and give these unelected, unaccountable and costly peers their P45s.
This week's defeat of the British government in the House of Lords over cuts to tax credits has highlighted just how much
Should the Lords become an elected chamber? Partly-elected perhaps but fully elected and we could end up with the same political game-playing and circus entertainment we often get with the House of Commons? Is that democracy? The public seem very discontent with politicians so why are we calling for more by having the Lords electable?
That Peers who failed to speak in the chamber during the whole of the last Parliamentary session claimed three quarters of a million pounds in expenses and allowances is surely a damning indictment on Britain's 'upper' chamber.
Certainly, the upper house needs reform in a number of areas, not least to ensure that numbers do not balloon to ridiculous proportions.The answer though certainly does not lie in stripping away all that is good about the House of Lords and replacing it with a room full of elected, whippable Lords, who will do what their party tells them.
Our democracy, like every political system across the world, needs reform and will always need reform but before we throw the bathwater out, let's make doubly sure we've removed the baby first.