how to sleep better

Accept that life with children just moves more slowly.
Consistency is often an important contributor to a good sleep routine, where you have a designated time to switch off from work, eat healthily and aim to go to bed and get up at the same time. Training your mind and body as to when to wind down is the key to supporting an effective sleep pattern.
Around supermoons people report more of a feeling of wakefulness, a feeling of being 'supercharged'. The full moon has a reputation for knocking people off balance, stirring emotions leading to 'lunatic' behaviour.
When we go up the wooden hill Direct to Bedfordshire I know you want to snuggle up It's your favourite desire I've let you
Often though we may be restless, find it difficult to drift off to sleep or awaken during the night, fully alert and unable to go back to sleep after only a few fitful hours. Let's look at how even busy people can negotiate with their lives and find ways to support a deep, refreshingly satisfying night long sleep.
The average person wakes naturally at 8-9am and goes to sleep at midnight to 1am (more like holiday sleep). Adjust these timings for your chronotype ('lark' or 'owl') using the MCTQ short questionnaire as it will tell you more about your sleep.
The times when we do manage to sleep well are often accompanied by a happier, calmer disposition where we find it easier to cope with life's stresses and strains. We all accept that it's important to sleep well.
My top tip for when you are still awake at 3am or woke up at 4am knowing sleep just ain't gonna happen is to practise Yoga Nidra or yogic sleep. It's a bit like a guided relaxation or meditation which allows your mind to be guided free of distractions.
By the time I was 25, I'd burnt myself out physically, mentally and even spiritually: I developed psoriasis, which covered twenty per cent of my body, and I gained weight. But the alarm bells really started to ring loud and clear when I began regularly waking up in the middle of the night with a nosebleed.