Humanitarian intervention

Images of thousands of refugees fleeing Myanmar have quite rightly focused global attention on the human tragedy of displacement and the search for safety. However, there is another story here, namely the scramble to deliver aid to over 400,000 refugees - the population of a small city.
During this trip I truly learnt to appreciate the many blessings we have, from the birds singing and flying around, to the green grass and pastures, to the feel and look of fresh water and the sound of rain dropping, even the dark clouds that comes full of rain, which the people of the Horn of Africa are now praying for that will bring them a renewed hope of life. We have to remember that water is indeed life.
Watching Russia's military intervention in Syria unfold has taken me back to my secondary school days when we put on the musical Annie Get Your Gun.
Iraq and Syria get most of the headlines in western media given the current focus on the threat from Islamic State to European and American interests and citizens, as well as the direct involvement of western military forces in the campaign against IS. But there's also a war going on in Yemen...
We can't intervene everywhere. We have challenges at home. Our resources are limited; so, too, our ability to affect outcomes. Good intentions do not suffice. Sometimes trying to do the right thing can make things worse. So when an atrocity unfolds, how do we decide when to intervene?
We can, with our technology, our material and our enviable financial position, intervene on the right side. We can fight the aggressors, the fascists, and rescue Iraq from the scourge of Islamist violence. But this is only possible in coalition, in alliance. Leaving the Kurds to fight the Islamic State alone is immoral; abandoning Iraq is equally bad; and letting the United States shoulder the burdens of internationalism alone fails the very definition of the term.
When will the bloodshed of innocent civilians in Syria come to an end? Why should innocent Syrian civilians have to pay the price for violence that has been prevalent in the country since the uprising against President Bashar al Assad? The humanitarian crisis in Syria is at its worst as civilians are being left without basic human needs due to limited funds.
The Jordanian border is difficult to police. There are more than 40 crossing points, and they are used by both refugees fleeing Syria's civil war and smugglers. Although border guards receive Syrians seeking refuge in Jordan on a daily basis, they must increasingly watch for infiltrators from both sides.
Ordinary South Sudan citizens have been extraordinarily affected by the violent events of the past weeks. The destruction of hospitals and markets, as well as the increased pressure on host communities due to mass displacement, brings me to this conclusion: South Sudan will face a humanitarian emergency for the months to come, and its people will need all the help they can get.