humanitarian

It's late 2026 and positivity is in short supply. Around the world, countries have turned in on themselves. Protectionist
In a humanitarian crisis, people need timely and accurate information about how to meet their fundamental needs. They want to know where they can find food, shelter, water and medical help and how they can keep themselves and their families safe.
Over recent weeks and months we've seen attacks on civilian targets such as hospitals and aid convoys in Syria and Yemen. We appeal to all parties to respect the basic principles of international humanitarian law - precaution, protection and distinction of civilians. Everything must be done to allow the safe and unimpeded access to any humanitarian organisation working to protect and assist the people fleeing Mosul.
In wars and disaster zones, a simple explanation is that humanity is a force that advances the idea of life, with dignity. To strengthen the idea of humanity for people caught in conflicts, epidemics and disasters, we could borrow some ideas from the Olympic motto: Citius (faster), Altius (higher) and Fortius (stronger).
Most conflicts now burn on for an average of 37 years, and those uprooted by them are crying out for a humanitarian response that reflects this. If a new deal for Kenya is realised over the coming months, Dadaab may no longer remain an anachronism. It could, with the right imagination, political drive and institutional support, come to represent the future.
Millions of people heard you. I heard you. This is what you said before the World Humanitarian Summit.
Ending the UK's commitment to spend just 7p out of every £10 of our national wealth on international aid is not the answer. This will send the wrong signal to both the countries we are asking to commit to the same spending, and importantly to the hundreds of millions of the world's poorest who we are supporting to lift out of poverty once and for all.
For the first time in the 70-year history of the UN, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has brought together world leaders and the humanitarian community for the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul, with the aim of making bold commitments to reduce the impact of the unprecedented wars and disasters we are seeing today.
Leaders meeting at the World Humanitarian Summit could transform the way we respond to the increasingly severe disasters
Impossible choices are being made every day by more than 125 million people affected by crises and natural disasters. In fact, we are in the midst of the worst large-scale humanitarian crisis of our lifetime. Not since World War II have more people around the world been in desperate need of assistance as a direct result of ongoing conflict and violence.