hygge

With candles and knitwear slowly taking over our homes, it seems a natural progression that hygge - the Danish concept of
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According to studies, it makes you happier, and healthier, and actively encourages you to put down the technology and embrace all things natural, soft, squidgy, cosy, warm and luxurious. The lifestyle trend, that has taken social media by storm, can be applied to all manner of aspects of ones life, from work to home.
When I first heard about Hygge, I didn't really see the relevance of it. So Danish people celebrate cosiness, who cares? But the more I look into this concept, the more I realise it encapsulates all that is good and healthy for the development of individuals, and of businesses.
Unless you've been living under a rock or are categorically immune to lifestyle blogs and candle company advertorials, you've definitely heard of 'hygge' by now - the mysterious, magical, wonderful Danish concept, which allegedly doesn't translate into English but is Britain's newest national obsession.
The word itself has been around longer than you may think, originally stemming for the language of the Vikings. Hygge was used to describe the feeling of finding shelter. These days it's about home comforts and everyday rituals that provide you with a sense of happiness.
As Autumn descends, going hygge in everything we do seems like such a good idea. I'm wondering how the health and wellness industry will take on such a sensibly happiness-inducing concept in an industry that often seems to thrive on more than healthy amounts of self-hatred.
The Danish philosophy of 'hygge' (pronounced 'HUE-gah') is a state of mind that embraces 'cosiness' and comfort. The rise in Scandinavian restaurants, cafes and bars across the UK is helping to export hygge and whilst many may not have heard of the term yet, they will almost certainly be getting the sense of it.