hysteria

Mori hypothesised that these forms of human duplicates which appear to be almost exactly but not quite identical to humans evoke a feeling of unease, eeriness and even disgust among viewers, particularly when the creations begin to move in an unnatural or mechanical way.
Whether this is what the British public actually wants, or whether this is the product of lazy journalism, I don't know, but with the increasing prevalence of social media acting as a barometer for public impulse I feel like this is a situation that is spiraling out of control.
In this case, it seems the judiciary went too far. It is surely questionable to factor into sentencing a febrile public mood, particularly when it is stoked by politicians and commentators peddling emotive and unscientific ideas about human behaviour.
This week, verdicts were passed on two men accused of sexually abusing minors. The manner in which the verdicts were passed could not have been more different...
SEE ALSO: Goldfinger! The 24-Carat Vibrator That Costs £10,000 They look not unlike egg whisks and drills, but these fierce
Taking a lesson from history, we should be asking what social inequalities are contributing to women's and mothers' mental, physical and psychosomatic health problems. Traumatic, stressful, debilitating childbearing should never be accepted as the status quo.
"I'll have what she's having," may have been coined 109 years before the events in Hysteria took place, but Nora Ephron's infamous line is just as applicable in Tanya Wexler's period romantic comedy that tells the story of the invention of the electric vibrator.
Rupert Everett left TV presenters Philip Schofield and Holly Willoughby squirming with embarrassment on Wednesday when he
This weekend will see the London release of the film Hysteria – a romantic comedy about the invention of the vibrator in