IDP Camps

"All of my friends have been killed," Abdullah* tells me. I'm in Khazer Camp for Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), 30
It's fantastic to see the media portraying refugees as human and hopeful and the BBC's Our Desert Home is worlds away from the regularly demonised refugees of the tabloids and poisonous political rhetoric of recent months.
As Nigeria decides who will lead the country for the next five years on Saturday 28th March, it is tempting to get caught up in the acidity of politics. Yet, when Nigerians head to the polls, it is vital that we - both voters and politicians - prioritise the health and wellbeing of our citizens in our decision-making.
As the international community holds its breath, hoping that the latest peace deal signed between warring parties in South Sudan holds, civilians caught up in the conflict are praying for an end to the killings, for the chance to return home and to plant their crops.
Life has disappeared from Malakal, a key town in oil-rich Upper Nile state, South Sudan. The clashes between government and opposition forces have turned Malakal, a square grid bordering the river Nile, into a ghost town. But some people didn't manage to escape - they were forced to witness the horror.
More than 380,000 Syrians have taken refuge in Turkey. The majority - some 350,000 - are registered, giving them the right to live in the refugee camps run by the Turkish Red Crescent. The remaining 30,000 are either waiting for registration, or have decided not to register so as to have the freedom to move on to other parts of Turkey.
Alia Mosa lies on a bed in a hospital in northern Syria. Her feet are wrapped in bandages. She is angry and despairing, and desperate to tell her story. "It was 5am," she says. "They launched missiles and my house was totally destroyed. Four of my children were killed and I was injured. One of my daughters and my husband survived."
The emergency in Mali has different characteristics than in Niger. There are no camps or large scale food programmes that one sees in the media where thousands of women queue for rations. However, one of the ways in which it is manifested is in child labour. Thousands of children have dropped out of school to go find work to help support the family.
During the food crisis, nearly 400,000 children in Niger are at risk of severe acute malnutrition because they have not had sufficient food to eat or a balanced diet. At the Tillaberi CRENI (hospital for children) built by Plan and managed by the government, I've met infants severely malnourished and tottering on the brink of death.
The Tuaregs here told me horror stories of pillage and plunder of their livestock, food, homes, clothes and their women - some had been raped and assaulted. Other women were taken from their homes never to be seen again. Other loved ones were missing and presumed dead...