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We give Rudyard Kipling's classic poem a modern-day - and English - slant. (Created by David Schneider, Very British Problems
Whether you deem it as a social family building trend or simply the scientific ability to navigate around Mother Nature, "traditional" surrogacy is not a new concept. As a matter of fact, it is the only form of assisted reproduction that dates back to biblical times. The story of Abraham and Sarah in Genesis chapter 16, is the most notable example.
We attempted everything under the sun to get pregnant and, although we are currently working with a surrogate, we got elbow, neck and knee deep in to the adoption process before that opportunity presented itself. When we made our announcement that we were adopting, we were shocked by the misconceptions people have about adoption.
What do you say to someone who is suffering through infertility? We'll we can certainly share with you what not to say. Over the years we have pretty much heard it all. Being on the receiving end makes you feel very exposed, sad, somehow less human. It was like we just admitted that we lost the primal ability to procreate, or procreate easily anyway.
During our last final bite at the IVF apple we let the world into our bedroom. OK, get your mind out of the gutter. We allowed MTV to film us for a year to document our infertility journey on the Emmy award winning series "True Life". Our show was "I'm Desperate to have a Baby". Not the most flattering of titles but also not entirely inaccurate either. We ARE desperate to have a baby.
We call on the UK Government to show leadership by recognising and acting upon the environmental, health and food security benefits of a move away from animal farming. With the CAP reform looming and many farmers ('dairy' farmers in particular) struggling to make ends meet, action plans should be developed for people wishing to switch from animal farming
Every six days land the size of London is bought and sold - often by people who have never even visited it, sometimes in an online click-and-buy. Some of those who take over the land will grow crops - often for biofuels rather than for food and, when for food, often for export rather than for locals.
I was actually at the launch of the Commission for Africa in May 2005. While the Commission made a big show about having African input into the consultations, I couldn't help but notice that the Ethiopian I was sat next to was one of the few Africans in the audience. Everyone else seemed much of a piece: officials from BINGOs (Big NGOs), western journalists, a few civil servants, and Labour Party workers.
As someone born and brought up outside the UK but now living here, one of the things I most admire about the British people is that they hold in their hearts the struggle against global poverty. The 'Enough Food for Everyone IF' campaign has united in one voice all the major NGOs and faith groups in the UK.
There was more than just the issue of the UK's future in Europe on the lips of leaders and influencers at the World Economic Forum in Davos this year. Two other words took an unanticipated, but deserved, prominence: climate change.