immigration debate

Changing the UK's immigration laws to restrict the influx of these skilled, flamboyant and yes, loud, workers might end up changing the country's landscape, and for the worse. Think about that next time you complain your pizza isn't up to Italian standards.
Yesterday, 10th September 2015, Parliament sat down to debate detention for asylum seekers and refugees. Impassioned pleas
Shadow business secretary Chuka Umunna has accused Nigel Farage of "maliciously" distorting the immigration debate - but
As a daughter of immigrant parents who came to the UK for postgraduate studies at university, I can safely say that the way immigrants are perceived (particularly exacerbated by right-wing media outlets) is frankly absurd and borderline ludicrous.
I don't believe that if, in 2005, we had known the extent of migration from the previous Accession countries and the scale of the recession that would hit us, we would have agreed to the restrictions being lifted now... Even at this very late stage, I urge the government to keep the restrictions on Romanian and Bulgarian migration for a further five years - I can see no other solution.
While Jack Straw may feel this was a policy blunder from his party, I do not believe this to be such a clear cut issue. It has been shown on countless occasions that immigrants coming to the UK bring a tangible profitable contribution to the economy.
The law essentially means that working class Brits are banned from marrying (non-EU) foreigners. Yes, you read that correctly. Almost half of the UK population has been stripped of its right to family life.
Immigrants from poor countries, arriving here with nothing, have to work twice as hard for the things normal people take for granted; they can only dream of the privilege Cameron enjoys. Something for nothing? Most immigrants were never given anything.
Behind the political discourses, the media headlines, the highly-frantic speeches and the amusing campaign, it is easy to forget that we are dealing with human beings whose lived experiences cannot be reduced to mere statistics or neat caricatures.
Compassion and immigration control have appeared as unreconcilable concepts since Theresa May's appointment as Home Secretary. Ever since she took office in 2010, Ms. May has appeared determined to respond to the tabloids' cries that the UK is letting in too many immigrants.