information overload

You read something that will make you healthier and pledge to do this from now on. You start as planned and one day as you happily browse...you see a contradictory piece on the very thing you have been doing to improve your health!! So frustrating isn't it?
Filtering through content efficiently allows us to sort the wheat from the chaff. It's a way of controlling the flood. Think of it like turning on and off a tap; without filtering, the content would just flow constantly and eventually drown us. We're searching for what matters most and what is relevant to us personally or professionally
Adblocking and publisher responses to it sit at the nexus of two trends: the increasing value of trust in the publisher-consumer relationship, and the emerging conditions of the new information market.
Adding more labels to grocery products, while representing an intuitive and reasonably cost-effective way to communicate nutrition information to consumers, is not without its fair share of weaknesses however.
Over the past few weeks I've been trying to untangle the motivation behind the broadcasting and sharing of such extreme violence. Is it to shake us free from western complacency? Or, is it simply to be the first to have something to say at the local bar among the Facebook-ers and Tweeters championing fashionable global concerns?
Life is full of moments which were always considered 'dead time': the walk to the station or the doctor's waiting room. This dead time may have felt irritating, but it created space in our lives for meditative thinking. The next time life creates an opportunity for dead time, seize it with both hands. Leave your phone in your pocket, the radio off, and allow your idle mind to wander, to experiment and to be brilliant.
A great paradox has arisen in our modern society - the more we invent faster and smarter ways of getting things done the more we are creating and caging ourselves in a frightening word of information overload, risking psychological exhaustion, burnout and a whole host of other psychological problems.
It's about exploring how we choose to use technology, and understanding the pull digital devices have on us. It's about being in control of how we fit digital devices in to our lives, rather than being ruled by them.
Feeling that we must stay connected is now impacting on our sex lives according to results from The National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal). As laptops and mobile devices make their way into the bedroom their owners are enjoying less sex than a decade ago.
The way it works is that you'd still have the same amount of hours in a week as you do now (168) but only six days in a week. So we could get rid of Monday altogether. Which is fine, because Mondays are stupid. Only The Bangles would be upset about losing Mondays, and they've already made their money