injustice

I can count on two hands the amount of times I've been subject to direct racist insults. It's always a terrible shock. It takes my breath away and stays with me forever. The sense of injustice, of prejudice, the realisation that people judge you as different.
The term 'activist' should really be stripped of its obnoxious (and in many cases unfair) connotations and begin to be understood exactly as what it really means: acting resolutely in accordance with ones most dearly held principles. The crowds that have been marching in unity throughout the world show that this process is already under way and I urge every one of us to raise their banner alongside them in solidarity.
This week has marked a pivotal moment in the British judicial system as the UK's highest court has finally ruled that the law on 'joint enterprise' has been wrongly interpreted for 30 years. I believe that to be an understatement.
Turing was posthumously pardoned and while he was a hero, there are thousands of casualties of that terrible law, thousands of men who are not heroes, but who cannot be overlooked for justice simply for seeking out the relationships to which all people are entitled... With this petition, I'm happy to play a small part in a campaign that can materially improve the lives of men convicted under discriminatory laws. The British government did the right thing by pardoning Turing, and now it's time for another positive step forward.
What should concern us all though, is a new class of injustice creeping into the system and one which not only can the Courts not deal with, but is one which is created by the Courts themselves. The problem is one of listing.
May 29th marked the 101st anniversary of the premier of The Rite of Spring, the brilliant musical composition attributed to Igor Stravinsky, and performed by Sergei Diaghilev's - The Ballet Russes Dance Company, in the City of Paris, France of the year 1913.
The UK government is neglecting a British former soldier who is losing an unfair murder trial in the Democratic Republic of Congo for the suicide of his cellmate and friend, his lawyer said.
Human rights are rights fundamental to all humanity. This means that everyone is entitled to their rights without discrimination; these rights do not consider age, sex, race, nationality, religion, language, ethnic origins or sexual orientation.
Many children dream of becoming a superhero, of righting wrongs and saving the world from injustice. Often, the superhero himself has suffered a difficult and painful childhood and wishes to protect others from a similar fate...
I know I will leave here one day, perhaps soon. I have long been cleared, for six years now. But what of the other men here? Again, I worry about the 80 people who have not been cleared more than I do about myself and the other 83 who have. Some might get a trial of sorts, but scores never will. They say it's because they can't use the evidence against them in court. Even if we believe this excuse, we might well ask why the evidence is inadmissible - is it because they tortured the men? If so, then a thousand years of experience tells us that the statements are certainly unreliable, and probably false.