Instant Gratification

So challenge yourself from today. Break free from the habit of getting instant results/gratification. By stepping away from that urge to take the easy route, you will become stronger and make better, more conscious decisions.
One of the by-products of instant messaging technology like WhatsApp and Messenger is the particular strain of frustration you feel when you don't get a quick response to a message you can see has been read. There's probably a wonderful German word for it.
My bet is that the UK consumer is not accustomed to waiting to spend. There is a culture of going for instant gratification, and consumer expenditure has been one of the major drivers of the economy over the last thirty-five years, leading to a large service element to the economy.
Google will provide an answer to pretty much anything, but I'm afraid there are some things that Google just can't help us with. Google can't tell you what you should be doing with your life, or reassure you that you made the right decision yesterday. So, in our fragile, digitally reliant states, we worry. And more and more of us are worrying more of the time.
We all have habits that we want to change: eat less, exercise more, stay out of our overdrafts; but this is easier said than done. Why is it that bad habits are so hard to break and new 'good' behaviours are so hard to stick to?
As technology continues to astound in its ability to bring an ever-shrinking globe straight to the computer screens of the world, and with no indication of this phenomenon slowing down, a growing trend among my generation continues to trouble me.