Intern

A rebel intern who yelled "f*** you" at President Donald Trump has been suspended. Some have hailed the intern for speaking out while others have condemned her behaviour.
I'm trying not to be too negative. It could still turn around. I could get a job tomorrow. Maybe one day I'll have my dream job where I'll be paid for my work. I'll laugh with my colleagues and have business lunches until one day ... So I beat on, scouring the internet for jobs, borne back ceaselessly into the couch.
If you know what your interests are and what tasks you enjoy, even things like writing or reading or talking, there is always a way to use those skills for the benefit of others. And if you do, it's highly unlikely you'll dread Mondays.
We hear the stories of many fellow comrades who have fallen foul to that 'vampiric' institution of unpaid internships which appears to sap the elixir of life from aspirational go-getters. These people have watched The Devil Wears Prada one time too many. There's a whole corner of the internet dedicated to sharing these exaggerated cosmopolitan horror stories.
You only get a short amount of time to impress people during your experience as an intern. It's important that you make the best impact you can, before you're quickly replaced by a sharper, friendlier, more eager version of yourself. The doors of an office are constantly traffic-jammed with a rotation of students dying to make a good impression.
As my time at Hand & Lock comes to an end I've been thinking a lot about the pros and cons of being an intern...
People have varying opinions of internships. I think people love to hear the horror stories of an intern but sometimes they aren't that horrific. After graduating with a degree in Fashion Design, the prospect of someone handing me my perfect job on a plate were starting to fade so I began applying for jobs.
What then do the companies offering unpaid internships care about more? The future job prospects of those who work for them? Or the opportunity to freely load onto them un-enviable, dull, un-fulfilling tasks which no-one else wants to do?
Last week a summer intern at a global investment bank in London died after allegedly working for 72 hours without sleep. He was 21. Whilst Moritz Erhardt's parents are trying to come to terms with this tragedy, the coroners in East London are investigating the exact cause of death...
Trivialising unpaid internships helps masquerade free work as an annoying, if inevitable, first rung on the career ladder. Because of this we risk the practice becoming the norm and contaminating other career fields until it is an utterly essential part of 'working' life.