internally displaced persons

"It is suffering that cannot be described in words, the words cannot describe the horror we have been through. War destroyed
The level of contamination is unprecedented in Iraq: there are explosive remnants of war and improvised explosive devices in fields, homes, sometimes inside corpses, or behind refrigerator doors. Our weapons clearance experts have already destroyed more than one thousand explosive remnants of war in just a few weeks.
People are trying hard to rebuild their lives. Schools are now open for registration and local primary health care centers are slowly opening up again. Some professionals who fled, such as teachers, doctors and nurses, have started to return. Although the local hospital in Hay el Sucar was largely destroyed, residents are adamant that it will re-open and a group of young locals are volunteering to clean it up, to get it running again.
Today we bid farewell to the first month of 2017, during which many of us have made and sought to maintain our New Year's
"All of my friends have been killed," Abdullah* tells me. I'm in Khazer Camp for Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), 30
In wars and disaster zones, a simple explanation is that humanity is a force that advances the idea of life, with dignity. To strengthen the idea of humanity for people caught in conflicts, epidemics and disasters, we could borrow some ideas from the Olympic motto: Citius (faster), Altius (higher) and Fortius (stronger).
This year I've travelled to some pretty difficult places. My work has taken me to war-torn Central African Republic (CAR) and to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in Africa. I have also travelled to the border of Serbia and Macedonia where I met refugees fleeing the fighting in Syria, Iraq and Somalia. In particular, I remember meeting children far too familiar with the sound of gunfire.
By the GEM Report and the UNHCR Education Section Days before the World Humanitarian Summit, we have jointly released a new
Faced with 59.5 million forcibly displaced people also forces the world to reconsider how we position ourselves in creating a future that does not become a holding pattern for misery, but rather a movement where we make the best of what we have.
As Nigeria decides who will lead the country for the next five years on Saturday 28th March, it is tempting to get caught up in the acidity of politics. Yet, when Nigerians head to the polls, it is vital that we - both voters and politicians - prioritise the health and wellbeing of our citizens in our decision-making.
It is not our role to discuss how best to bring peace, but it is up to us to address the impact of the conflict on civilians and their humanitarian needs. The need to scale up assistance is great and urgent. Access will become increasingly difficult in some areas - already aid agencies have to negotiate to reach people in need on a daily basis. More supplies are desperately needed in order to support ever-growing numbers of displaced people. Iraqi Red Crescent and ICRC volunteers and staff must be able to deliver assistance safely. Let there be no doubt that the crisis in Iraq has developed into a humanitarian one - and that addressing it is what the term humanitarian means.
As the international community holds its breath, hoping that the latest peace deal signed between warring parties in South Sudan holds, civilians caught up in the conflict are praying for an end to the killings, for the chance to return home and to plant their crops.
Life has disappeared from Malakal, a key town in oil-rich Upper Nile state, South Sudan. The clashes between government and opposition forces have turned Malakal, a square grid bordering the river Nile, into a ghost town. But some people didn't manage to escape - they were forced to witness the horror.
A person who doesn't communicate is like a person who is imprisoned. They are excluded from the outside world, without information. They don't hear any news.
Last week, I was part of a UN inter-agency convoy that brought much-needed emergency supplies to the Areha district, including for nearby Muhambel town. It has been months since humanitarian assistance has been able to get through. Even now that the fighting has stopped in this area, the 22-truck convoy had to take a circuitous route to avoid active hot areas.
An eerie calm descends over Al Waer, an outer suburb of Homs, as we enter an area that is home to some 400,000 people caught in the middle of on-going conflict. I am part of a joint mission, including UNICEF, WFP, OCHA, UNDSS, and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent, here to access the humanitarian situation.
According to Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC), there are about 200,000 persons in need of humanitarian assistance in the governorate, but the actual number is expected to have increased recently. People have come from other parts of the country including Homs, Aleppo, Raqqa, Deir Ezzor, Idleb, and Deraa. New arrivals continue to flow into Tartous on a daily basis.
Oumar, 16, was preparing for exams when insurgents overran his historic town of Timbuktu. The town was first captured in March by fighters from the Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA) who want an independent state in north Mali. Weeks later, Islamist extremists seized the town from them.
Today marks World Refugee Day. Today is a reminder for us to think about the 15 millions of people who aren't as lucky as we are, those mothers, fathers and children who can't go back to the homes they were forced to flee and loved ones they had to leave behind.