international aid

Through our support for Overseas Aid, Britain saves a life every two minutes and today an overwhelming majority of MPs voted to guarantee it in law. Spending just 70p out of every £100 in tax collected is changing the face of our planet - to the betterment of the world's poorest and yes, to us too.
Friday's Parliamentary vote on Michael Moore's Private Members' Bill is a chance for MPs to reconfirm the UK's status as a global leader in the fight against poverty. I urge them to grasp it. It is surely not too much to ask the UK to continue to give 7p in every £10 of national income to help the world's poorest people...
Of the billion people worldwide who have a disability, the vast majority live in developing countries. People with disabilities represent some of the most excluded of all groups in the community. They are less likely to have access to healthcare and education, and in turn find making a livelihood and escaping poverty that much more difficult, if not impossible.
I suspect most of us want to see an effective international aid programme. But only by addressing some of the institutional processes by which money is awarded and projects assessed are we likely to feel as confident as we ought that British international aid is making the difference it should, and difference it could.
Ukip would "decimate" Britain's aid budget and hamper efforts to tackle the Ebola virus, a Labour MP has suggested. Speaking
Our partnership with Nuaké is sustainable, we have a relationship based on trust -few similar projects can claim the same- and I think we both benefited and gained a lot from this experience...
The Western World is aware that international assistance is required to help rebuild less developed countries... Unfortunately, there is a lack of awareness of what it takes to make these systems work in the different cultural settings. This is especially the case with Afghanistan, which is years behind in progress due to 35 years of conflict.
Britain is to give £3 million of aid to Iraq as the first step in dealing with the humanitarian consequences of the bloody
Britain should cut aid spending to Pakistan and divert it to poorer countries unless "clear evidence" is produced that it
Last week I heard that Lawrence, a young boy I met a while ago in Kenya, had passed his exams and scored in the top 25 per cent of children in the country. What is exceptional is that Lawrence is blind.