international education

Earlier this year, The House of Lords passed an amendment to the Higher Education and Research Bill that would remove international students from net migration figures. True to form, the government quietly removed this amendment in a pre-election 'wash up' when the bill was sent back to the House of Commons.
Despite the English language being the third most widely spoken language in the world and providing a huge benefit to those
Schools in the UK will also have the opportunity to put forward their case for scholarships to get free micro:bits, which means the pocket-sized codable computers will be more accessible to a new generation of technology pioneers regardless of their backgrounds.
The events of last Thursday have somehow cast more uncertainty into the most uncertain political situation in the UK in recent memory. Even before the ruling, the country lay in a state of political limbo. An environment where countless young people felt let down or angry.
Theresa May's government needs to work with the HE sector to decouple international students from the question of immigration. It should also listen to the British public and recognise that international students are very valuable, temporary visitors who make an enormous economic and cultural contribution to the UK.
In his book, The World is Flat, Thomas Friedman argues that the global market is becoming a level playing field with historical and geographical divisions becoming irrelevant. For many expat families, this has become the new reality with globalisation taking them out of their home country and placing them in new environments.
Your education is all too often evaluated by asking "Where did you go to school?" rather than asking "What did you learn in school?" Instead of validating learning through legacy, we should judge the quality of an education by how well it prepares students for future challenges in a globalised world.
I for one, am particularly proud of what my friend has achieved and very excited about what it will mean for the children of Sierra Leone. Sam's work is a vital addition to all of the hard work already going on within the country to provide the next generation with the education they have a right to.
Names often trigger certain ideas in people's minds. Personally, Mandela is a euphemism for hope, equality and freedom.
Is 2014 the year when tuition fees rise yet again for struggling UK students? According to the BBC, UK universities are already