International Whaling Commission

Japan has restarted commercial whaling for the first time in 31 years. It is the first commercial hunt since 1988, after commercial whaling was banned by the International Whaling Commission. It still killed several hundred whales each year through a loophole allowing “scientific” whaling expeditions in the Antarctic Ocean. The catch quota for the end of this year is set at 227 whales.
Much reporting from the recent 66th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC66), where representatives from nations
Which august international body celebrated its 70th birthday by paying special attention to faecal plumes? And what, you
At IWC 66, we should celebrate the 30th anniversary of the moratorium. The IWC and its members should be proud of its growing engagement with modern issues and we should all look to see where else it might be able to lend assistance!
Today Japan's whaling boats have taken to the high seas of the Southern Ocean to resume their kill of Antarctic minke whales after a pause of only one year.
Together with 11 other conservation and welfare organisations, HSI recently launched a petition urging the UK government to do just this. If you care about the whales and you are a UK citizen or live in the UK, please sign and share the petition to get your voice heard.
On at least two occasions since the moratorium on commercial whaling was agreed by the International Whaling Commission (IWC), member nations have circled around the idea of coming to some form of compromise between the pro-whaling and the pro-whale sides. These attempts at compromise have failed and the moratorium remains in place, but there are indications that another deal is in the offing. This is an unfortunate development.
Counting whale corpses matters! It not only shows how devastating whaling has been but as the latest revelations show, it also underpins one of the key arguments against any resumption of commercial whaling in the future - which is that whaling must be subject to independent scrutiny...
Japan should note that the commitment of those peoples and nations that see no place for whaling for profit in the modern world remains strong and, if anything, the current Japanese inquisition will be causing them to sharpen up their arguments and resolve against commercial whaling.
Countries worldwide must take decisive and meaningful action to bring the slaughter to an end, and the démarche is a good start on this march towards a fully effective worldwide ban on commercial killing of the whales.