internet freedom

A world beckons where computer algorithms, corporations and governments collude to assess and censor everything we publish. Where we feel safe and protected, and will never see anything that offends or alarms. This is not a world for liberals, the free thinking or indeed anyone who opposes the powerful.
Much online behaviour is terrible. We take things personally, throw insults, shut down debate, never challenge our own ideas, and generally act like idiots. Not you, of course  - but lots of other people. There is a better way.
Illegal guns and child pornography are bought and sold. Terror groups are using Facebook to radicalise young people in their bedrooms. Islamic State propaganda is splattered across the internet in greater quantities and in plainer sight than ever. Why isn't Twitter capable of getting rid of this stuff? Social media companies should be doing more!
I entered politics because I wanted to fight and campaign against the ongoing suppression of our nation's freedoms from the European Union, yet here we see the vital freedom of privacy from the state is being undermined and disregarded by our own UK government.
As attention turns to the referendum on whether the UK should leave or remain in the EU, the 'in' camp has decided who will help target their campaign at young voters. June Sarpong will attempt to get the message across to young people that the EU isn't so bad.
Protest is increasingly going digital. Whether it is using the internet to organise and report physical acts of protest, using online space as a platform on which to take action, or targeting online infrastructure itself: across the world, people are taking their right to protest online.
This calm and well-informed approach is vital to ensure that no new legislation is rushed through to beat the sunset clause of December 2016 outlined in the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act.
Anderson, unsurprisingly, does not condemn mass surveillance in principle and endorses bulk collection by the security services, but the report does call for a radical overhaul of how surveillance is regulated.
Beyond The Ballot is The Huffington Post UK's alternative take on the General Election, taking on the issues too awkward
Twitter is not the business of the police, and users should not be reporting people for what they say. We have to accept that opinions are not right or wrong. No one is the guardian of the correct answer. This is not and exam and you are not the invigilator.