intersectional feminism

If you're upset, do something - listen to the voices of people of colour, do your own research, give money, time or resources to spaces and platforms for people of colour. As Siana points out in this episode; if Charlottesville was a surprise to you, you've not been paying attention.
If patriarchy is, as Bergdorf argued during her interview with Piers, "a structure that puts men at the top of power", isn't he right? After all, if our country is effectively run by women, how can there be gender inequality? Unfortunately, it isn't quite that literal.
Queer culture/drag culture for the most part has been synonymous with gay men, and has had very little space for anything else. When was the last time you saw a woman in full drag on RuPaul's Drag Race? Or maybe even a drag king?
When we decided to create a feminist podcast, we knew that the world didn't need to hear from more voices like ours. We are two white women with many other privileges that are important to recognise. The things we take issue with are small parts of a larger problem.
We are used to clothing defining us. You only have to pick up most mainstream magazines to be told that the brand, the fabric, the cut of the clothing and how you wear it make an instant impression.
"... So, how do you have sex?" Inappropriate, right? Being a Brit, there are few things we are more prude-ish about than discussing our sex lives, and yet, this is a question that many people think is okay to ask trans people. Why? It's probably got something to do with society seeing trans identities as a novelty, and therefore not legitimate
Did things end well? Or not so well, and you explain the animosity by declaring that they were 'out of their mind', 'crazy' or 'unhinged'? This kind of language is harmful and enormously disrespectful of people with mental health problems, so we wouldn't normally use it - but here it's important to use those labels.
We all have mental health and keeping well is a challenge. Many of the people closest to us have battles with theirs that we could never even imagine, but being an ally when we are able to, can help stop those feelings of darkness in others. We are so often much stronger than we think we are.
The motivations of the Women's Marches were not as simple as they may have looked on paper. Some marched for reproductive rights, some in response to Islamophobia. Women marched so that their voices may be heard, though each voice said something different. This said, it's important to remember that these differences need not separate us. Positive movements such as feminism should, ideally, display no barriers between race, background, belief or sexuality, but rather solidarity amongst the diversities that define us.
With women making up 45% of all competitors and a record high of 47.5% of events open to female athletes, this year's Olympic
When you look at the submissions collectively, it becomes a struggle to frame us as 'politically apathetic'. We aren't just a cross in a box - we've got strong beliefs and passion. I honestly think that when it comes to the relationship between young women and our politicians, it really is a case of 'it's not me, it's you' - it's clear we've got the enthusiasm and ideas, so the question is, politicians, what are you going to do about it?