Iran nuclear weapons

There's surely something ... amiss here. With all due respect to Mr Hamilton and his super-fast Mercedes, I don't think winning a car racing tournament is the most important thing that happened yesterday. Or indeed, any day.
Depending on the domestic support Rouhani can build, Iran may be inclined towards a more critical stance on Putin's territorial expansionism for the sake of rebuilding relations with the EU states and preventing Ukraine's break-up from setting a precedent for Iran's own ethnic problems.
Ignoring the devious humbug from Vienna, perhaps Paris on June 27 might just be the right place from which to set the principles necessary to re-start with a new, humane and more realistic policy on Iran.
The who's who of the world's foreign policy and security community met this weekend at the 50th Munich Security Conference. As befits a half-century anniversary, there was a fair amount of reminiscence, in particular over the life and legacy of the conference's founder, Baron Ewald von Kleist.
Several days ago a man with a neatly trimmed beard wearing a white turban, and professorial-looking rimless glasses featured prominently in Davos. Was it really Hassan Rouhani? Of course Rouhani is Iran's current Ayatollah-sanctioned President and should have every good reason to be at such a prestigious forum; however the man addressing Davos appeared only to share the real Rouhani's appearance.
William Hague has hailed implementation of an interim deal to freeze Iran's nuclear programme. The Foreign Secretary said
The recent surge in Tehran's consensual, moderate and constructive relationship building with the US, however, could not take place were it not for a palpable desire on Washington's behalf to entertain an increasingly hospitable Tehran.
Nuclear apocalypse has been avoided. Iran has agreed to curb its nuclear activity. That's what they tell us anyway. Let's not get ahead of ourselves; even if Iran's cooperation is genuine, world leaders and their Iranian counterparts are not about to hold hands, hug it out or start tweeting funny cat memes to each other.
The real test of the Geneva agreement will be whether it does mark a move away from the old failed model of military conflict and towards building long-term peace instead. Ultimately, though, this requires full transparency of all nuclear programmes by all countries, full international cooperation for the immediate elimination of all weapons of mass destruction and an end to future reliance on nuclear energy. Only then can we be sure that our hopes of a secure deal for the planet will be realized.
David Cameron put in a call to Hassan Rouhani on Tuesday afternoon, marking the first time a British Prime Minister and an