isis caliphate

If ISIS want Muslims to take their call to allegiance seriously, they should begin by protecting the rights of the weakest in their societies - the religious minorities... Despite ISIS' grand claims, almost every Islamic religious authority has dismissed their legitimacy to the Caliphate.
It is not our role to discuss how best to bring peace, but it is up to us to address the impact of the conflict on civilians and their humanitarian needs. The need to scale up assistance is great and urgent. Access will become increasingly difficult in some areas - already aid agencies have to negotiate to reach people in need on a daily basis. More supplies are desperately needed in order to support ever-growing numbers of displaced people. Iraqi Red Crescent and ICRC volunteers and staff must be able to deliver assistance safely. Let there be no doubt that the crisis in Iraq has developed into a humanitarian one - and that addressing it is what the term humanitarian means.
The idea of Muslims having one unifying leader is an established position in Islamic philosophy. The term for this leader is "Caliph" (successor). In his article, Mehdi Hasan makes a sweeping and quite preposterous rejection of an Islamic State having any "theological", "historical" or "empirical" evidence...
Let me make a prediction. The so-called caliphate in Iraq and Syria will be totalitarian, won't be Islamic and, in the words of the former US state department spokesman Philip Crowley, "has as much chance of survival as an ice cream cone in the desert". By declaring statehood, Isis may have sown the seeds of its own destruction.