it skills

But in reality are we really headed for a dystopian sci-fi future where the threat to humanity is on a global scale? Probably not, but AI will certainly impact our working lives as it has our home lives.
Over the past few years we've seen the unstoppable rise of the geek. From popular culture to big business, the geeks have inherited the earth. They're the billionaires, the modern day rock stars, and their many achievements have resulted in a significant change to their status in popular society.
An in-depth look at the state of the UK job market reveals a very troubling reality: the skills young people are learning in schools simply do not correspond with the needs of modern businesses. According to a recent Skills Crunch report, two-thirds of companies fear a lack of skilled workers will put the brakes on Britain's current economic recovery.
For many in the technology sector, one of the most discussed topics in recent months has been digital fraud and online security. This is an area in which I have a great deal of interest, as it continues to play a significant role in the demand for specialist skills in the Financial Services & Banking Sectors.
If we don't drive interest in IT the impact on business could be brutal. I'm concerned that graduates may be misguided into taking courses that only heighten the competition to get jobs but are ignoring the potential to really stand out from the crowd by learning critical IT skills that businesses really need.
The dust has settled on the Budget 2013 and the political fallout has been well documented. Putting politics aside and focusing on the actual issues, it's true to say Chancellor George Osbourne's Budget statement contained both positives and negatives as far as the tech industry is concerned.
Poor computer skills could be hampering young people's career chances, the Prince's Trust charity warned on Tuesday. Around