jargon

Could tech be the key to this? The introduction of new and innovative technology in recent years has certainly made the workplace far more attractive to today's tech-savvy youth. This particular demographic, also known as "millennials" or "generation Y" are well accustomed to the use of technology in every aspect of their daily lives.
If you or a loved one have just received news that breast cancer is now part of your lives, you might find yourself looking for answers while dealing with big emotions. You might also find that breast cancer jargon feels like a foreign language course you didn't sign up for.
All industries have cultivated their own jargon. When you step into that industry, adopting their jargon shows that you belong, that you're part of the in-crowd, one of the gang. Whether you're in finance, legal, medical, theatre, retail.....each one has it's own lingo, it's own marker.
At the end of the day it's a win-win situation for sports agencies to avoid jargon in all their marketing strategies. Thinking outside the box is now a no brainer for sport PR pros looking to produce engaging and informative content...
As learning and development professionals we have a responsibility to nurture the skills to make bridging a reality. We can start by helping people to learn and develop, not just in homogeneous flocks in isolated training rooms or the sealed environments of remote learning, but also via experiential learning that exposes them to real-life unfamiliar others.
I've spent the last year collecting Journalese, the language of news, and have just published a book that offers to explain what it all means. The thorny issue of sourcing has got its own chapter, and when it came out, I was taken to task over two entries..
If I read the words 'team player' one more time, I'm going to scream. We're hiring at work. And everyone who applies is dedicated and conscientious, and strategic, and tactical, and organised... and dull. Nigh on every CV sounds exactly the same (no-one tell us they're a lazy misanthrope who can't multitask, strangely - though I'd be tempted to interview them).
It really is possible to produce corporate communications that actually communicate. It's not easy, and you'll be caught between the irresistible force of 'we've always done it this way', and the immoveable object of fifteen rounds of tedious approvals that will slowly bleach out any interest or readability your bold first draft might once have had.
Office workers are fighting back against the scourge of "management-speak", dubbing the very phrases intended to lubricate
I went to a meeting about autism the other day, its aim basically to improve services for people with autism.