jayne morris

I hadn't taken my shoes off and walked barefoot since last summer. But, a couple of weeks ago the sun was shining, the first signs of spring had emerged and I decided to indulge in being barefoot, my favourite method for bringing mind and body present, so that it is possible to hear the deeper stirrings of the soul.
Rituals can be found at the very foundations of every ancient culture, yet their significance today is often overlooked. Human beings naturally gravitate toward rituals. For example, the way we comb or brush our hair, the route we take to work or the things we do when we prepare for a big competition, presentation or meeting.
Spring is a time of recreation and awakening. As Mother Nature stirs from her winter slumber, new life surrounds us and offers an invitation to attune with the energy of the earth and reactivate the parts of ourselves that have been in hibernation.
Behind every burnout there is a story of overwork and overwhelm, which is why it is becoming a problem of epidemic proportions and affecting people of all ages and professions.
For both men and women to truly 'have it all' we need flexibility in the way we work so that we can take better care of our own needs and those of our children. This is vital not only to help prevent burnout of the workforce but also to prevent the burnout of our children.
I used to be addicted to busyness. I could not sit still for longer than five minutes without feeling the urgent need to be doing something productive. There was always something drawing my attention for me to work on. I was unaware that I had made busyness the purpose of my life. In all of my busyness I forgot to look after myself.
A recent study by Robert Half UK, revealed that nearly a third of UK HR directors cite 'inability to balance personal and professional commitments' as the primary reason for employee burnout. Could the new UK government legislation offering flexible working rights for all help make a difference?