jihadism

The state has a duty to protect all its citizens. Until it can ensure that some of the most vulnerable members have access to justice, then it is failing in this duty to provide equality before the law and access to justice. And equality means one law for all, accessible to everyone.
One of the most powerful moves we can make is to act upon male violence, through using our education systems to challenge the idea that violence is acceptable, taking violence against women seriously, and provided interventions for violent men to challenge their behaviour.
Combatting extremism will take a multinational movement towards international relations based in humanitarian principles, rather than national self-interest only - a principle that has, in the past, served extremists rather than confronted them, and which reflects the interests of an elite corporate and ruling class rather than the people of Britain, regardless of background or religion.
As someone who grew up between two cultures, I have been fascinated with the question of why men and women with similar backgrounds to mine were drawn towards radical messages of hate and violence. Was it a response to Western foreign policy, to the position of Muslims in the world? Did it come from an inevitable clash of diametrically opposed cultures?
Since their removal from power this time last year, the Muslim Brotherhood has constantly been the focus of Egyptian headlines. But when, in early April, Downing Street ordered an inquiry into the group's 'philosophy, origins and activities', it entered the UK domestic political scene too...
Whilst debate rages on about the threat of foreign fighters returning home, there is one particular fighter who is being celebrated not only in his community but also on social media...
I am definitely against the niqab for a variety of reasons: Many people see it as a visual proof of subordination of females. People in the United Kingdom see it as a rejection of British culture and refusal to integrate. One is tempted to ask why they don't choose to live in an Islamic country and enjoy their Hijabs and Niqabs unhindered and unnoticed.
It is easy for security analysts, former Islamist penitents and politicians to rely on ready made narratives on why the UK is still producing Jihadists... But ultimately acceptance of these easy narratives has lead to misunderstanding and wrong policy decisions. The truth is our post-Enlightenment mind finds it difficult to comprehend men who look at the world differently from us.
The attacks on Algerian gas installations and the Mali insurgency has led the UK Prime Minister to describe this as a 'generational struggle'. However, what is happening across the Sahel region is a different terrorist challenge altogether, requiring a reappraisal in strategy.
Thus far, America has retaliated by claiming the lives of over 1,000,000 people around the globe. Wars - some blatant, some covert - in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan and Yemen have allowed the US to flex its militaristic muscle and send a message to the world; 'We are not to be messed with'.