jobseekers

Deny it all you want, but at some point in your life you've been forced to clear your browsing history because of some questionable content you found yourself viewing at nearly midnight on a Friday after a stressful week. Sometimes the temptation is just too much to avoid surfing to the wrong side of the tracks and what follows is a swift re-writing of history where we pretend that we were on the phone or had dropped off for a moment instead.
I believe that now the economy is back on track and the statistics consistently tell a positive story, perhaps it is time to remember that people are people, and to really think about what is holding back those who remain unemployed and what we all can do to help them.
It's a shocking fact that just under one million young people are not in work, education or training in the UK today. That's about one in six of all 16 to 24 year olds. Of these, a third have been out of work and claiming Job Seekers Allowance for more than six months.
Nick Clegg was taken to task on his LBC radio show by "William from Stafford" over how government welfare changes were forcing
The story below was sent to UnemployedNet by a jobseeker who was unhappy with the service she received from her local jobcentre. She was made to sign a blank jobseeker's agreement in a session with others who were also made to do the same thing.
Here are my suggestions on what to do with the next year. Take a step back and really think about what you want from the next 40 years of work. It's a long time to be doing anything, so don't rush it. Surround yourself with people and things that inspire you. Learn everything you can.
In the last month we have heard the news that youth unemployment fell by around 20,000 in the three months up to May. There is clearly a long way to go but people seem to be feeling a bit more optimistic about the job market for the first time in years. It feels great to know that more people are finding work and gaining the experience, not to mention self-confidence, that they need. However, while finding a job can be a great boost, especially if someone has been struggling to gain employment, it doesn't mean that happiness automatically follows.
So the government's Spending Review for 2015-2016 has been delivered. To the usual fanfare of cheering and jeering in the House of Commons, Chancellor George Osborne kicked off with the assertion that we're "all in this together" - is that still going? - but then comprehensively managed to prove quite the opposite.
The government's work programme, intended to help jobseekers back to work, is failing people with disabilities as well as
The government's controversial "nudge unit", which encourages people to make better lifestyle choices, is to be part-privatised