lactose intolerance

Lactose intolerance is a gastrointestinal condition, recognised throughout the medical community as loss of function in the enzyme lactase that helps us digest lactose, the naturally occurring sugar in cows' milk.
Worryingly, the trend is greatest in our young generation of 16-24 year olds who are shunning dairy at the fastest rate, despite needing it the most during their strong bone-forming years to prevent health issues such as osteoporosis or thinning bones later in life.
With people becoming more and more aware of the environment, we're seeing a rise in dairy-free diets, as well as vegetarian and vegan diets. There's also a case of many people just wanting to try new options- new research shows that 31m people in the UK are keen to drop dairy from their diet, but only 12% of people actually attempt to switch to a dairy-free diet
It might feel non-sensical to fill your body with more fluid when it already feels fit to burst, but the NHS says that not
Myth-busting and uncovering the truth about food is part of a day's work for a dietitian. From the latest celebrity diet, to the supposed miracle approaches of the latest nutritional 'guru'; some myths are easily explained, others more insidious and seem to return like a nasty bout of flu circulating.
Cow's milk allergy can be difficult to identify as the symptoms are often general and non-specific and may or may not be immediate. I've seen children react within minutes of having milk and others react hours or even days later, making it difficult to pinpoint the exact cause.
karandaev via Getty Images 1. Protein With 3.4g per 100ml, the drink is a strong source of protein. In milk, there are two
Dairy dreams with professional eaters.
PROMOTED BY ARLA LACTOFREE
A fresh look at dairy with a bunch of recipe experts 🙌
PROMOTED BY ARLA LACTOFREE
Promoted by Arla Lactofree