Lady Geek TV

Do the sort of Barbie-girls portrayed in soft-core pornography actually exist? Clearly the management of Fujitsu believe in this fantasy otherwise they would not have just announced Floral Kiss, the most preposterously stereotypically ultra-feminine computer invented since Look Around You's Petticoat 5.
For Lady Geek, Ada Lovelace day is a bit like Christmas. Lady Geek was set up in 2010 with the aim of bringing women and technology closer together, and our most recent campaign 'Little Miss Geek' is working to inspire the next generation of women to join the technology industry.
'I'd rather be a dustbin man than work in IT'. These are the exact words of an 11-year-old girl. That's how she responded to my suggestion that she consider a career in technology. Ouch.
It's true what they say, the Samsung Galaxy SIII really is the phone to rival the iPhone cult and potentially the first phone that's questioned my brand loyalty to Apple. It creates a synergy between human and phone, and is a step towards the genuine conveniences that we all imaged when smartphones burst onto the scene.
You get a 5 megapixel camera and the luxury feel without the hefty price tag, allowing you to upgrade in a year's time and spend the money you saved on another great mid-range phone.
How can you tell when a company has "arrived" in the world of consumer electronics? It's not just about getting great reviews in blogs and magazines - what arguably matters most is the respect and fear of your peers.
This week Wayne Rooney received a slap on the wrists from the Advertising Standards Authority for passing off a blatant advertisement for Nike as a personal tweet. It's the latest in a long line of examples of major companies getting it wrong - and getting caught out - when it comes to 'hidden' marketing on social networks.
Recently I was lucky enough to talk to Lee Epting, Content Services Director at Vodafone. But how has she felt working as a woman in a man's world? Does she feel - like many women I've spoken to - that she has to sacrifice femininity in order to achieve strength in the workplace? At the end of the day, does Lee have to put on a 'man suit' and play by men's rules?
Luluvise, the new social network built exclusively for women, is trying to pull-off a difficult trick: How does a network reach critical mass while excluding half of the world's population? Is there any role for a social network whose major selling-point is who it will not let in?