lauren vaknine

Immediately after announcing a pregnancy or giving birth, after the obligatory oohs and aahs and coos have been inflicted, there will inevitably come the slew of unwanted advice ... from every person you've ever known.
Despite the government's miseducation, we are fortunate enough to live in an age where information is available wherever we are on the planet, at the touch of a button. We are hearing about the dangers of increased sugar consumption everywhere, so why are people choosing to give refined sugar to their children, especially when there are so many alternatives? There really is no excuse anymore to be shovelling this rubbish into our children.
Don't get me wrong, my labour was long and it was hard work, that's why it's called labour. But it was the most incredible experience of my life and I'm so glad I did the research beforehand to enable me to re-evaluate everything I'd ever been told about birth and to therefore switch off from the negativity surrounding the subject and be able to believe that it could be a positive experience.
For you, half an hour seems like an eternity. You can't imagine the day where your baby might play on his own for half an hour while you tend to chores and cook - one less thing you'd have to do in the evening. But he won't play on his own. He needs his mummy to be near. He needs to feel you.
People going through fertility treatment don't want sympathy; what we want is validation of our feelings, validation of the flurry of emotions that are stirred up in us as we embark upon one of the most difficult things we'll ever endure. We need to know that you get how hard it is, even if you haven't been through it yourself...
But hold on a second. What if I do need it?? What if by believing for so long that I am a coper and that I can 'just deal with' having a child who hasn't slept for 15 months, I've exhausted myself even more?