lee rigby

The Internet is a vast place. Bigger than anyone, except a computer scientist, can imagine. It's a massive iceberg. What we see via Google and any other search engine is called the Clearnet and is potentially less than two per cent of what's actually out there, buried deep down in the Darknet or Deep Web.
The guilt and responsibility for that lies with the terrorists who committed the crime. The security services - as the name implies - have the job of keeping us secure. But there is a public consensus that anyone in a position to prevent that terrible vicious murder should have done so.
More must be done to tackle online crime, and Facebook should cooperate. But expectations of pre-emptive screening of social media content to detect threats are fantasy. Suggestions of wide-scale, pre-emptive internet surveillance probably aren't nefarious, 'Orwellian' attempts to watch our every move; but they do misunderstand what's really possible when dealing with the internet.
We must approach today's report with calm and thoughtfulness. We should recognise that surveillance of an entire population is both an unacceptable intrusion on our freedoms and creates nothing more than a chilling effect on free expression for anyone communicating in, or with, the UK.
A parliamentary watchdog has blamed Facebook for failing to prevent the murder of Fusilier Lee Rigby, it was claimed today
The government has been accused of trying to spin a long-awaited report on the murder of Lee Rigby to bolster its case for
As counter terrorism awareness week commences front line police officers in London and elsewhere are becoming increasingly fearful that they are likely to become victims of savage targeted attacks on the streets of the UK by fanatical Islamist jihadists.
I understand the economic constraints of today but if £50 billion can be found for the HS2 high speed rail line to cut time from London to Birmingham, then money should also be in place to protect the jobs of our armed forces.
The death penalty is not even a sufficient deterrent of crime. The UK's homicide rate is 18 times lower than the United States, where they do utilise execution.
Sarwar and Ahmed, both of whom pleaded guilty to terrorism offences last month, purchased Islam for Dummies and The Koran for Dummies. You could not ask for better evidence to bolster the argument that the 1,400-year-old Islamic faith has little to do with the modern jihadist movement.