legacy universe

If you're a voracious science fiction reader you'll be well aware that the traditional print publishing houses aren't capable of keeping up with your demand for quality books. Even more so, you'll be aware that when it comes to science fiction series the wait between releases can often be painfully long.
If there's something that readers universally love about the Kindle, it's the fact you can get so many great books at great prices. What they love more, I assume, is that you can get a lot of good stuff for absolutely nothing too. Nada, zip, etcetera.
The life of an indie author involves several things; ferociously refreshing the sales statistics for their latest releases, obsessively checking social media, maybe a bit of Googling their own name. What it rarely involves, unfortunately, is them looking at how the new ePublishing market can be brought forward, and how that might help them.
The volume of self-published authors, otherwise known as independent, that continue to outsell Big Six books on Amazon's Kindle store is pretty surprising. Less so has been Amazon's decision to operate its own imprints, ensnaring some of those successful indies into formal, mutually beneficial publishing deals.
The one thing that the Amazon Kindle can't do though is turn non-readers into bookworms. The Kindle Fire may well outsell its book-focused older brother, but those newly ensnared by Amazon's web of content will not immediately be interested in what's been uploaded to Kindle Direct Publishing that week.
Regular users of the Amazon Kindle store will know that their reading options aren't just limited to traditional books. For
In a recent blog post I covered just how successful romance authors can be, so it seemed like a good idea to interview one of the best. Bella Andre is the prolific author of the bestselling Sullivan Family series, as well as the Bad Boys of Football books, along with many others, and she kindly sat down to give me her view on digital publishing, and what lies ahead for her.
It doesn't matter if a book is good in a classical or academic sense. All that now matters is whether or not people want to read it and if they'll pay to do so.
If there's something that the advertising for the Kindle, and indeed any eReader device, promotes, it's that reading digital books is for everyone.
Amazon proudly boasts that, as of May this year, digital books are now out-selling their print equivalent on the world's largest online store.