lesvos

By Conor Fortune, News Writer at Amnesty International You can't stop a ship dead in its tracks, but sometimes you can change
This is Ed... A couple of days ago Ed thought he was going to die. We love Ed, and were worried he might die too, but as he didn't, we can now tell his crazy story. Ed has just made the journey from the Syrian border, across Turkey to Izmir, and across the Aegean sea in a rubber dingy to Lesvos. Determined to show what refugees are ACTUALLY going through as they travel, he documented the journey every step of the way.
Visiting the small and makeshift graveyard on Lesvos, set up by caring local volunteers, as I did in recent days, is a heart
In 1951, inspired by a mix of guilt and hope, governments around the world got together to write a Refugee Convention. It
As a member of the rescue team, Dan spends the early hours waiting to spot incoming boats on the distant horizon. These boats are packed with terrified refugees making the crossing from Turkey, only a few miles away; a small stretch of sea which has become one of the most dangerous in the world over the past year.
Sinister as it is, I don't blame the islanders for this - I appreciate that their income relies on tourism. What is far more
So it's Christmas. It's been a tricky one for me to think about this year from the depths of Calais's refugee camp known as 'The Jungle'. However, a couple of Christmas-related things have been happening which I though I would share, as an insight into Christmas as a refugee.
The worst of it was, what the volunteers were experiencing is nothing at all, compared to what the refugees are living. A merciless nightmare with no end in sight. These people left war, death and destruction in their own countries, with the hope of finding safety and peace. Europe, where people are happy and life is good, where things will be OK.
War was something that happened on TV until the summer of 2004. A boat carrying Iraqi families had crashed somewhere on the
One in every 122 people in the world are asylum seekers, refugees or internally displaced in their own countries. More than half of the world's refugees are children. One of them is Sami*. He is 15, from Syria. Sami is here with a friend, his family are back in Syria.