Libya Protests

Libya is now in flames. This might seem to be a rather hyperbolic note on which to begin, but it is true. The country is spiralling out of control, and the city of Benghazi, the former rebel capital in the 2011 revolution against the dictatorship of Colonel Gaddafi, has reportedly been captured by Islamist militants and declared an 'Islamic emirate'.
Security in Libya remains an ephemeral prospect. The country is awash with guns and militias, numbered in the thousands. Since the collapse of the Gaddafi regime, successive transitional governments have consistently failed to impose their authority over the entirety of its territory and to reverse a deteriorating security climate.
These issues are an aftermath to a 42-year-old oppressive regime, which silenced its citizens. Everyone wants a say now. Everyone believes they deserve a say, even if it is at the expense of others. However, despite all the problems that Libya has faced and will continue to face, I still possess a glimmer of hope.
A court in Egypt has reportedly sentenced to death seven Christians for taking part in an anti-Islam film Innocence of Muslims
It is funny how some in the western press can be so inconsistent. When several families were murdered unprovoked in Afghanistan, it was virtually obligatory to needlessly emphasize the truism that the presumed culprit was not the embodiment of the American soldier.
Instead of unreservedly condemning the violence and defending free expression, however, a number of Western commentators have sunk into a swamp of half-baked liberalism that appears to believe only in the necessity of committing cultural suicide as hastily as possible.
The poorly dubbed film reportedly cost $5m and had a cast of 59 actors Various obscene references appear to have been dubbed
Libyans took to the streets of Benghazi on Wednesday to protest against the US embassy attacks that led to the death of four
Reuters correspondent Lin Noueihed and Middle East analyst Alex Warren have written an comprehensive account of the revolution and counter-revolution underpinning the Arab Spring over a year after its inception.
The heady optimism of 2011 and the rapid fall of the regimes of Gaddafi, Mubarak and Ben Ali, has been replaced by disappointment in the new military leadership in Cairo, deep divisions in Libya and of course the continued brutal clampdown against protestors in Syria.