live below the line

At emerge poverty free we work through local partners in East Africa to help people lift themselves out of poverty. Sometimes this is through an education project or by provision of clean water, and sometimes it is by establishing a demonstration farm, so that local communities can learn about improved farming techniques and better crops.
Whether or not you agree with his recent comments, that the survivors who risked all to escape Libya should be sent back, it's important that we all try to understand what drove people to take such risks. The simple answer is extreme poverty.
My charity Send a Cow, is currently one of a number signed up to Global Poverty Project's Live Below the Line campaign. It encourages people to live for five days on what the world's poorest survive on for a lifetime. In the UK that means eating and drinking on £1 a day.
Today is Day 2 of Living below the line. Yesterday's food came in at an astounding 61p, which I can't quite believe is possible...
I've run the London Marathon, cycled 100km, done soup diets and climbed mountains, but this has been the most physically and mentally gruelling challenge of my life.
To end malaria we need a commitment from a generation of people to see it through. We at Malaria No More UK will work tirelessly to achieve our aim but I'm also making a call out to you. How do we persuade every day people, business leaders and policy-makers to see this through? To end deaths from malaria - and to end malaria - in our generation.
I'm halfway through my Live Below the Line challenge - a campaign which highlights the challenges faced by 1.2 billion people who live in extreme poverty every day - and frankly, I'm shattered.
When I launched Live Below the Line in the UK in 2012 I didn't think doing the challenge was going to be difficult at all. I thought those who screwed up their faces when I proposed the challenge were simply lazy. I remember being a student - the Smart Price pies, Pot Noodles and spaghetti shapes. Living on so little for over three years, how hard could living on £1 a day for five days really be?
The annual global anti-poverty campaign Live Below the Line 2014 challenges people to experience living on only £1 a day for food and drink. The challenge runs over 5 days from the 28th April to 2nd May 2014 in the UK and on various other dates in participating international countries.
Five days on a £1 per day allowance for food & drink. No meal gifts, no using what's already in the cupboards, just budgeting a fiver. This was not going to be easy. It would mean willpower, possible hunger, monotony and sacrifice of both luxury and well, a social life not to mention my beloved wine.