london exhibitions

I wish I could take you all by the hand and give you a guided tour of this show. If I could, honestly I would because, simply
Much like the lyrics of a Springsteen song, this is a collection that seems to romanticise and reflect the lives of ordinary Americans, rather than a collection of portraits. And in that lies the lure of these incredible photographs. What a wonderful opportunity to see so many shots from a great pioneer.
David Hockney. The man is practically a national treasure so it is with some trepidation, and a heavy heart, that I have to say, I'm not particularly crazy about the new show of his work at the Royal Academy.
Selfie culture may be a modern phenomenon but performing for the camera ain't nothing new. And how cameras have been used to capture artists at work and performance art is the subject of this new exhibition at Tate Modern.
The exhibition starts with the preliminaries. Churchill was determined to harness the potential of science and the Royal Society helped compile a register of 7000 scientists who could contribute to the war. Additionally Churchill hired Frederick Lindemann as his personal scientific advisor.
Human Rights, Human Wrongs at The Photographers' Gallery is a thought-provoking photography exhibition that examines the legacy of iconic images. Spanning the years from 1945 to the early 1990s, the exhibition reflects the major political upheavals, conflicts, wars and struggles against racism and colonisation that became particularly urgent after the Second World War...
There is an extraordinary diversity of subjects in this top 10 list of London exhibitions for 2015. Mark these in your calendar and your brain will be like a sponge, just soaking it all up.
Make Life Worth Living is a collection of photographs at the Science Museum taken by Nick Hedges between 1968 and 1972 of the impoverished urban housing conditions that many Britons lived in...
The new exhibition of Guy Bourdin's photography at Somerset House presents us with a conundrum. There is no doubting the man's eye and talent for image creation, but these images were taken over 30 years ago and today, many of them are deeply uncomfortable, some of them arguably offensive.
The Design Museum's new exhibition Women Fashion Power examines how female fashion has changed in line with emancipation and showcases examples of how powerful women have used fashion to define and enhance their position in the world. But by including the word 'power' in their exhibition title, I can't help but feel the Museum has set itself up for a fall.