lonely

It comes a shock when you learn, very quickly, that it’s entirely possible to be surrounded by so many people your own age and to feel almost claustrophobically alone
“It’s my 75th birthday today you see. And I can’t bear spending it alone in the four empty walls of my home."
Social isolation peaks this time of year.
You wouldn't be alone in wondering whether PND was an illness of the millennial generation as they start to become mothers - with the statistic that mental health issues effects 1 in 5 mums (and 1 in 10 dads) but most of the baby boomers not having come across many mums who struggled in their time.
I already suffered from depression and anxiety previous to my diagnosis. Up until that point I had managed to get it under control to a degree and I was medication free. However, being given some news as life changing as that can have a traumatic effect on your mental state and for me personally it really knocked me back.
Whilst I never quite reached that level of maudlin, the very real sadness affecting parents whose children have recently left home is something I can relate to. After my daughter left our family home for university the loneliness I felt in the aftermath was almost palpable.
The obsession with loneliness has not just sprung from nowhere. There has been a therapeutic turn in policy-making and in society more broadly; and, post-Brexit, a uncomprehending elite reaction to a society they imagine to be somehow less friendly than it was a year or so ago.
Being quiet and well-behaved alone don't make an excellent student, not if that student isn't meeting their potential. Schools want to help every child succeed, but with increasing importance placed on results and rising numbers of unqualified teachers in the classroom, it's more important than ever for us to ensure these children aren't missed.