long-term care

In America there is much talk of the 'Silver Tsunami'. According to Microsoft's Ed Steidl what we should really be talking about is a phenomenal global business opportunity.
In an unusual show of unity, Innovation Leads for IBM, Intel, Microsoft and other major corporations, will join forces with the European Space Agency, European Commission and representatives from various UK Government Departments in London next week.
When we think about an ageing population and our neighbourhoods of the future, there are a couple of perspectives that spring to mind. Let's start with the essence - but one that is too easily forgotten - and that is the end-user him/or herself.
As regular readers will know, I run Creative Skills for Life (CSL) a campaigning social venture that works with like-minded organisations; notably Innovate UK, the government's innovation agency.
Earlier this month I gave a speech highlighting the need for a revolution in long term care at the Economic Ministry in Warsaw
Traditional health and adjacent business will be affected, shaped and in some case redefined. We all stand to win from this revolution which could make ageing a lot more fun than it is for many older adults today. The future really is in our hands.
Last week I wrote about an event staged in London involving more than 200 speakers, stakeholders and thought leaders representing the private, public and 3rd sectors, with a vested interest in reimagining our future.
Last week more than two hundred would-be revolutionaries answered a call to arms and gathered in London with a view to reimagining the future - let me tell you about the first day of the proceedings...
Employing more mature celebrities to endorse products in a world saturated with pouting teens and seductive twenty-somethings, is evidence of a growing trend of brands readdressing an affluent market which is feeling misunderstood.
A Revolution which aims to inspire businesses - large, medium, small, micro, and entrepreneurs - to join forces, in a united effort to imagine new products and services with potential of disrupting the institutional model of long term care; a model which is currently not fit for purpose