Louis Saha

The real question is whether Friday's vote will actually catalyse true reform? Or should fans and spectators steel themselves to simply meet the new boss, same as the old boss? We probably won't have any answer for years - but Friday will set the tone.
Players are easy targets. We've got a lot of money to throw around and half of us don't know what to do with it; so a lack of business acumen, twinned with poor or dishonest advice, quickly becomes a recipe for disaster. The situation isn't made any better of that the macho attitude has disdained asking for help or admitting you have a problem.
Fame and wealth can be temporary. A football career isn't likely to last as long as one would like and therefore, the importance of planning ahead can't be stressed enough; although sometimes a difficult reality to accept.
Although the public will revel in blaming the player's demise on a lavish lifestyle few can afford, many downfalls are a result of impressionable young athletes taking advice from supposedly reputable advisors who in reality have the ethics of a common criminal.
It is a catastrophic state of affairs when the conduct of the politicians of football has detracted from the beautiful game. World football is in desperate need of individuals such as Gill, Figo, Prince Ali, and Platini to take the reigns of the organisation and guide it to a culture of fairness, transparency and ethical practice. It is imperative for the sake of the sport and the principles the governing body transfer to impressionable youths that these changes are brought about in a timely manner. Cultural change of an organisation is a monumental task, but with the departure of Sepp Blatter I believe the process can now get underway.
Interestingly, it's not until a major incident happens, such as the Fifa arrests, that people start getting involved with the transparency debate and why the sports industry needs to address the lack of it urgently. Looking at the Qatar scandal and the refusal of Fifa to publish the whole Garcia report, which most certainly suggested that some level of corruption was taking place within the organisation, yet the severe allegations about potential corruption died off fairly quickly and again, the issues that should have been addressed on the back of this was buried once again.
The Roman rivalry was put to one side on Wednesday as AS Roma captain Francesco Totti and Lazio striker Louis Saha met Pope
Robin van Persie is set to make his Manchester United home debut against Fulham on Saturday, following in the footsteps of
Sunderland have announced the signing of veteran Premier League striker Louis Saha on a one-year deal. Saha, a free agent
Carlos Cuellar has become the first signing in what could be a busy summer for Martin O'Neill and his Sunderland side.