low carbon economy

Sharing activity has proliferated in the last few years. Thanks to the rapid growth in applications like Uber and Air BnB, more people than ever are exchanging resources with each other to reduce costs and contribute towards sustainability. But while sharing cars and homes has become the norm, what about other resources like energy?
Most recently, the UK signed up to a pledge to keep global temperature increases well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels as part of the Paris Agreement. To deliver on this promise, a diverse energy mix that includes renewables, and in particular solar and wind, will be needed.
Theresa May's decisiveness on infrastructure represents a political break from Cameron and Osborne, but her messaging has the same political purpose: Britain will build its way out of trouble, and in doing so, it will make itself great. Low carbon is the best way to be great now, and for the next 50 years. After all, what we build today becomes tomorrow's infrastructure. We really are the builders.
This week the Paris Agreement to address climate change enters into force, just ahead of world leaders reconvening at the
If we really want to adapt to climate change, it is crucial to embed this process deeply into our business and financial systems, enabling us to build truly sustainable models of adaptation to climate change.
As corny as it may sound, you get out of life what you put into it, and Carbon Week is a great example of this principle. Aston has been a leading university for graduate employment success for over 20 years, and offering Carbon Week to students like myself is another way of helping us to increase our awareness and be one step ahead of the game.
When the EU election results were coming in on Sunday evening, one thing was very clear early on; extreme right wing parties gained huge ground across the union and in France, Denmark and the UK anti EU parties won the election outright.
The United Kingdom is well positioned as a leader in many of these areas, in particular energy management systems, offshore wind and expertise to tackle air pollution. And, as the United Kingdom renews its own energy infrastructure, there are huge opportunities for collaboration.
Whether man-made climate change is occurring or not, there are few who would argue against a move towards low-carbon energy generation. One way or another, carbon emissions must be cut. Forget the tired anti-nuclear rhetoric and the ridiculous claims that a Fukushima-style disaster could hit the UK. Third generation nuclear is the way forward and the new reactors planned at Hinkley Point are the first step in the right direction.
My job as energy and climate change secretary is to both power the country and protect the planet. Nuclear power delivers on both of these objectives. I'm determined to use all of my powers to make sure that Britain leads the way in sourcing the energy we need from low carbon sources.