low-carbon energy

Most recently, the UK signed up to a pledge to keep global temperature increases well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels as part of the Paris Agreement. To deliver on this promise, a diverse energy mix that includes renewables, and in particular solar and wind, will be needed.
The world population is set to explode, from 7.3 billion today to around 9.7 billion in 2050, with two thirds of those living in cities. As urban areas grow, emissions will grow along with them: between 67 and 76 per cent of global energy consumption takes place in urban areas, consumption that accounts for a huge amount of total greenhouse gas emissions.
The road to the Paris climate talks has been paved across decades. And as leaders convene in the capital today, they'd do well to look to those campaigners - past and present - whose resolve, courage and vision has roused the world to reach this moment.
Of course, CCS may be developed by other countries, and the Treasury is probably hoping that it will prove cheaper for someone else to develop the technology and then buy it in. But, until then, policy will need to deploy renewables at much greater scale, and push industry to transform to become much more resource productive. This will be the real energy reset.
Aside from the sneaking suspicion that this is actually a spooked Governmental response to the rising numbers of UKIP voters, aiming to stop the progress of large solar before it becomes as unpopular as wind with NIMBY voters and causes anyone else to defect, there is a far more immediate problem.
Whether man-made climate change is occurring or not, there are few who would argue against a move towards low-carbon energy generation. One way or another, carbon emissions must be cut. Forget the tired anti-nuclear rhetoric and the ridiculous claims that a Fukushima-style disaster could hit the UK. Third generation nuclear is the way forward and the new reactors planned at Hinkley Point are the first step in the right direction.