Malaria No More UK

A new era has begun for the World Health Organization (WHO) and the stakes are as high as they have ever been. With the transition
Over the years game-changing research and development in the malaria field has given us long-lasting insecticide treated nets that protect millions of families every night.
The need to end malaria for good is as important as ever when half of the world's population is at risk and a child dies from this preventable disease every two minutes. How can we let up when life-saving treatment for each of those children costs less than a cup of coffee? Together we can #EndMalaria.
This weekend it's out with the old and in with the new as we welcome a new era for international development, including a target to eradicate malaria once and for all... The battle against malaria is well under way, but we have to go the distance to win the war.
As African leaders and our own Head of State rightly warn, we should not distract our attention and efforts from also fighting the one disease that has killed more children than any other in history (and a child every minute), malaria.
Whilst the England squad or holiday makers taking anti-malarials can make the news and raises critical awareness, the story behind the headlines is that a child still needlessly dies every minute from this preventable disease which costs less than a cup of coffee to treat.
This World Malaria Day we have the opportunity to continue to dismantle malaria's grip on African households and indeed entire economies. In doing so, we will help release the potential of future generations to flourish and move our world decisively to a healthier, more stable and prosperous future.
Here we are again - glued to our TV screens, revelling in the hilarious and at times toe-curling jungle trials of ITV's I'm a Celebrity... Get Me Out Of Here! This year's series is captivating the nation's imagination more than ever with the opening episode bursting back onto our screens with a record-breaking audience of 12million viewers. The show's popularity is all the more impactful because behind the fun and frolics in the jungle, the celebrities have united to support an important cause - Malaria No More UK.
Friday is the Day of the Girl - a moment to recognise that children, especially girls, despite their own enormous determination, often face insurmountable challenges to fulfilling their potential. They face wholly undeserved social, cultural and economic barriers. Although there are more obvious girl-specific barriers, in much of Africa malaria is one of the greatest single obstacles to the fulfilment of a girl's potential - and one of the cheapest to remedy. Not only is it one of the biggest killers of children under five (around half a million children a year in Africa), but for those who survive the bout of malaria, it can be recurrently debilitating for years afterwards.
On 23 September, the UK Government announced its contribution to the Global Fund and we got a step closer to the day when no child dies from Aids, TB or malaria. The UK has pledged £1billion over the next three years - providing the overall target of $15billion is met from other governments and donors.