Malaria No More

There's no tournament on earth like Wimbledon and, after winning here three years ago, I'm looking forward to returning with the home advantage and the incredible support of my fans, and giving it my best shot. This year I'm proud to be wearing Malaria No More UK's logo on my sleeve. I've supported the charity's work to end malaria deaths for seven years now... In the fight against malaria, when funding has been reduced or stopped many countries have seen the disease return with a vengeance. We cannot afford to stand still or let any ground slip when so many lives and futures are at stake.
We need the philanthropists of this world along with scientific genius, pioneering business leaders, creative communicators - and we need you, if we are all to beat this terrible disease. I invite you to join us and make ending malaria a legacy recognised by all generations to come.
A week ahead of World Malaria Day, there is much that rings true in his words, for in the fight against the world's biggest killer disease, many small things (backed by some big commitment) have led to extraordinary progress...
Some years ago when I was living and working in rural Uganda I got malaria. As I took the long bus journey to the hospital, shivering and sweating, I was asking myself would I get there in time? Would the local hospital have the right treatment available for me? Why hadn't I been able to prevent myself getting malaria?
The World Cup will come to a close on Sunday, but our fight against this killer disease will continue. Despite tremendous progress that has seen death rates decreasing by more than 40% globally and almost 50% in Africa alone since 2000, almost half of the world's population is still at risk from malaria.
Whilst the England squad or holiday makers taking anti-malarials can make the news and raises critical awareness, the story behind the headlines is that a child still needlessly dies every minute from this preventable disease which costs less than a cup of coffee to treat.
At Malaria No More UK we stand shoulder to shoulder with everyone whose lives have been affected and all those working tirelessly to fight this deadly yet preventable epidemic... World Aids Day is a day to spur ourselves on for action and refusal to accept that this is how things will continue to be.
Here we are again - glued to our TV screens, revelling in the hilarious and at times toe-curling jungle trials of ITV's I'm a Celebrity... Get Me Out Of Here! This year's series is captivating the nation's imagination more than ever with the opening episode bursting back onto our screens with a record-breaking audience of 12million viewers. The show's popularity is all the more impactful because behind the fun and frolics in the jungle, the celebrities have united to support an important cause - Malaria No More UK.
There was some good news last week as the government has announced it will significantly increase its support for the Global Fund over the next three years - subject to other countries following its lead. The UK is doing sterling work to champion the fight against three of the world's biggest, preventable killer diseases - Aids, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria. This support will enable hundreds of millions of lives to be transformed and help give families, communities and entire countries the chance to thrive and reach their potential.
On 23 September, the UK Government announced its contribution to the Global Fund and we got a step closer to the day when no child dies from Aids, TB or malaria. The UK has pledged £1billion over the next three years - providing the overall target of $15billion is met from other governments and donors.