male violence

If we want to end violence against women and girls, we need to start with ending the consumption of it as entertainment. We need to stop financially supporting an industry based on the construction of women as props in order recognise that women are people too.
Janet Jordon is not responsible for her own murder or that of her daughter and partner. Jed Allen made a choice to kill his mother and sister. He made this choice within a context of endemic male violence against women and girls. These types of murders are not isolated or tragic. They are simply the extension of patriarchal control over women's bodies and lives.
This idea that universities must become 'safe spaces' free of dissent or discussion is infantilising an entire generation of students. Staff put content notes on lectures, but you cannot study history without learning about genocide, mass rape and religious wars.
25,000 men have signed a pledge "Never to Commit, Excuse or Remain Silent about Violence against Women"- of course it should be 20 million , but it's a start, and we have 150 grassroots Ambassadors promoting discussions of the issues across the UK.
We need to talk about why the woman raped isn't considered an important part of this news story. We need to talk about why a woman who was raped, forced to leave her home and change her name isn't considered worthy of the same consideration as her rapist... Why are we more concerned with Evans' career but not that of the woman who was raped?
Toxic masculinity is real and it is killing us. It is killing women and children. It is also killing men. We need to start tackling men's rights extremists and toxic masculinity before we raise another generation of men who believe, like Andre Breivik and Rodger Elliot, they have the right to kill.
Men who kill choose to kill. Men who rape, assault and torture women choose to do so. Rodger's crime isn't an aberration. The video he released on YouTube is the same justification given by millions of men who choose to harm women.
The HMIC report blasts the police but even this report is ignoring 38 dead women and the role that the government and other state organisations have to play in ending male violence against women.
When we think about women killed through male violence, most of us think of the two women a week killed by their current or former partner, yet in the last two years, 30 women in the UK have been killed by their sons, 16 women were killed in 2012, 12 in 2013 and so far two men have been charged with stabbing their mothers in 2014.
Women are a community and our community is not safe. Our community is being killed by men - and whether we're killed by our partners or ex-partners, our sons, our muggers, our rapists; whether we're 22 or 82, whatever our race or religion or lack of religion, whether we're prostituted women, brain surgeons or shop assistants, none of us should count more than any other.