mallett

This week I want to mourn and celebrate my friend and close work colleague at Mallett for nearly 20 years who has died far too young in her 60s.
I am just one of millions of British citizens and other Europeans who have benefitted from freedom of movement. All this does not matter as we are irrevocably in this situation and we have to make the best of it. Head up, chin high and off we go.
After nearly five years of quasi independence as a roving antique dealer and erstwhile fair organiser I found myself boarding
In London the sun is shining, the public walk in a daze and semi-naked young and old parade their interesting bodies around
The joy of London is that everything is here. There is an endless parade of buildings of every possible period and style available as a delicious smorgasbord.
I had planned to leap from my bed and take exercise followed by a hearty breakfast but it did not quite happen that way. I hauled myself out into the day following a rather later night than was wise.
The Palazzo Venezia is home to the Rome Biennale. The palazzo is only partially obscured by the fair and its magnificence creeps out at the corners and when you look up the ceilings. The history of any building in Rome is a tapestry of information but this building is both an erstwhile papal residence and was also used by Mussolini, whose presence can be felt everywhere.
My first time in NY I had a terrible row. A director of Mallett at that time - it was 1996 - on arrival I was daunted by my first experience of serious jet lag. It was stupid o'clock in the morning, as far as I was concerned, when I sat down to dinner with my then boss Lanto Synge.
Masterpiece is at a fulcrum moment and it is always the case that TEFAF comes at that crucial moment, the last few pieces of the jigsaw puzzle of exhibitors are falling into place and we are ready to move from the plan stage to the build stage.
In London work carries on as semi-normal. Certainly the profound and crucial ritual of lunch continues unabated.