marathon running

Over the last few weeks, with the London Marathon now within arm's reach, I have really felt the fear. And by fear, I mean fear of everything from fuelling to falling ill (pretty much on repeat). The highlights, you ask?
It's official. Running has taken over my life. As someone who has never screamed at my favourite footie team on the TV or come first in anything (except for a rather exciting egg and spoon race as a child), I didn't see it coming.
I started running because I wanted to show cancer that it could take a lot of things - my hair, my right boob, my tummy fat (to create the new boob) and my dignity - but it would never take my smile.
It does seem that every man and his dog has something to say about my - some might say - reckless marathon challenge. And, I've got to admit, some of it is just a little bit weird. What anyone faced with relentless street pounding, high vis outfits and reduced quantities of alcohol does not want to hear is any of the following...
On April fool's day 2014, I made a decision. A big decision that may change the course my life. I have spent the last 12
I'm honestly not sure why I'm running the London Marathon. And I'm desperately trying to keep it that way. If there's one thing I've learned from training it's the importance of tactical stupidity.
Marathon running: it's not as easy as it looks. Just ask this kid, who tried to run alongside the competitors in the Glasgow
For most of us, the thought of running a marathon is pretty intimidating - but that's exactly what one woman has done, and
Motivation is about a whole lot more than desire, willingness or enthusiasm. It comes from deep within the most powerful recesses of the mind and is at the root of much of what we do - or don't do - in our lives.
As you do. Yes, congratulations to Florida man Joe Salter - who recently ran a 26.20-mile marathon in five hours, 51 minutes